FAQ

How early should I arrive for my appointment?

If this is your first session, please arrive 15 minutes early to give you and your therapist time to discuss your goals and establish an initial treatment plan. After your first session, please arrive 10 minutes early to allow time to discuss the results of your last session and your goals for today's session.

The outside office door will be locked during your session. For this reason, please plan to arrive no earlier than 15 minutes prior to your session.

Where will my massage session take place?

Your session will take place at the Vitality office in a private, comfortable and quiet room. Soft music will be played to help you relax (you can even suggest your own musical preference).

Will the therapist and I be alone at the studio?

Yes. For general safety, the outside studio door will be locked during your session. For this reason, please plan to arrive no earlier than 15 minutes prior to your session.

Are there any conditions that would make massage or bodywork inadvisable?

Yes. That's why it's imperative that you complete your electronic health intake form prior to your session. It is very important that you inform the practitioner of any health problems or medications you are taking. If you are under a doctor's care, it is strongly advised that you receive a written recommendation for massage or bodywork prior to any session. Depending on the condition, approval from your doctor may be required.

Should I refer to my therapist as "Masseuse" or "Massage Therapist"?

The short answer: Massage Therapist. The titles masseur and masseuse have a long and colorful history related to massage. Both terms were used to describe men and women, respectively, who provided massage in exchange for payment. But by the 1950's both terms became synonymous with prostitutes operating under the guise of providing “massage,”.

Over the past 30+ years, massage professionals have worked to help enact laws that protect titles reflecting their professional training and standards. Today, state laws protect these titles including massage therapist, massage practitioner and massage technician.